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STARGAZING CALENDAR 2022

Take a look at our calendar to plan your trip around the best stargazing dates. don't miss the Milky Way, view the moon in the telescope, catch meteor showers and eclipses, and see the best planets, Jupiter and Saturn in our telescope!

  • September 4 – 13: Full or near full moon

What: Full moons bring very bright light to our stargazing programs. While we can take a close look at the moon in our telescope, it also means we won’t be able to see the Milky Way or most deep space objects. The moonlight a few days before this full moon will be quite considerable as well. However, the main constellations will still be visible and it is a great opportunity to get an up close, detailed look at the moon! 

  • September 14 – 28: New moon or crescent moon

    What: One of the best times to go stargazing! You can’t see a new moon, but it does mean we’ll have ideal stargazing conditions as there will be no reflecting light from the moon. Ideal for Milky Way and deep space objects!

  • September 16:  Neptune at Opposition

    What:  The blue giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year, normally it’s too far away to see with the naked eye but could be visible tonight!  In our telescope it should appear as a small but very blue dot.

  • September 26:  Jupiter at Opposition.

    What:  The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons. Our telescope should be able to show you some of the detail and color in Jupiter’s cloud bands as well as it’s four largest moons (maybe more if we’re lucky!)

  • September 29 – October 2: 1st quarter moon

    What:  A “half-full” moon, which is still quite bright. The Milky Way is diminished but there are more visible stars than during a full moon PLUS you get to see the moon in the telescope.

  • October 2 – November 7: Orionids Meteor Shower. 

    What:  The Orionids is an average shower produced by dust grains left behind by Halley’s Comet. This shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7 and peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22. During this peak, a thin crescent moon will leave mostly dark skies for what should be a good show, however a full and near full moon at the beginning of month will affect the visibility of all but the luckiest shooting stars. 

  • October 3 – 13: Full or near full moon

    What:  Full moons bring very bright light to our stargazing programs. While we can take a close look at the moon in our telescope, it also means we won’t be able to see the Milky Way or most deep space objects. The moonlight a few days before this full moon will be quite considerable as well. However, the main constellations will still be visible and it is a great opportunity to get an up close, detailed look at the moon! 

  • October  6 – 10 – Draconids Meteor Shower.

    What:  The Draconids is a minor meteor shower, unusual shower in that the best viewing is in the early evening instead of early morning like most other showers. The Draconids peak this year on the the night of the 7th. The illuminated moon will block out all but the brightest meteors this year, but if we are patient and lucky, we may still be able to catch a few good ones.

  • Oct 14 – 28: New or crescent moon

    What: One of the best times to go stargazing! You can’t see a new moon, but it does mean we’ll have ideal stargazing conditions as there will be no reflecting light from the moon. Ideal for Milky Way and deep space objects!

  • Oct 29 – Nov 1: 1st quarter moon

    What:  A “half-full” moon, which is still quite bright. The Milky Way is diminished but there are more visible stars than during a full moon PLUS you get to see the moon in the telescope.

  • Nov 2 – 13: Full or near full moon – (only available private bookings)

    What:  Full moons bring very bright light to our stargazing programs. While we can take a close look at the moon in our telescope, it also means we won’t be able to see the Milky Way or most deep space objects. The moonlight a few days before this full moon will be quite considerable as well. However, the main constellations will still be visible and it is a great opportunity to get an up close, detailed look at the moon!

  • As our season ends and temperatures drop, we offer only private tours in the month of November, an exception may be made for the eclipse this month.

  • November 8:  Total Lunar Eclipse 

    What:  During this type of eclipse, the moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color. The eclipse will be visible outside of Capitol Reef National Park beginning at 1 am and last for three hours. Sleeping Rainbow Adventures may host a bonus stargazing event to make the most of this special occasion. Email us for more details or if you are interested. If enough people are interested, we will happily host a special event!

  • Nov 14 – 27: New or crescent moon – (only available private bookings)

    What: One of the best times to go stargazing! You can’t see a new moon, but it does mean we’ll have ideal stargazing conditions as there will be no reflecting light from the moon. Ideal for Milky Way and deep space objects!

  • We do not offer stargazing from the end of November until our on-season begins again in March